Designing the on-boarding experience for Pollfish

OVERVIEW

Pollfish is a survey platform which gives researchers the ability to create surveys and collect results online through mobile apps and  the web.  

The two main personas of the platform are the Researcher - someone who wants to create a survey and the Publisher - someone who wants to utilize monetization through their app or website.

Focusing on the Researcher funnel, our numbers showed that 79% of the customers who landed on the sign-up page continued to the product and from those who continued (new-sign ups) only 22% completed the journey to check out (buy the survey).

ROLE

UI/UX, RESEARCH, UX STRATEGY

COMPANY
PERIOD

Dec 2017 - Feb 2017

LAUNCHED

Published -  March 2017

My Role

As the sole Product Designer of Pollfish, I led the initiative for designing the on-boarding experience for the platform for the Researcher persona. I conducted user interviews, mapped out user journeys and designed small progressive quick wins so that we could iteratively enhance the on-boarding experience.

I worked alongside a Product Manager, a Sales Manager and a Customer Support Manager.

The design solutions were launched globally in February 2017.

https://www.pollfish.com/signup/researcher

The Challenge

1.
Reduce the number of new customers bouncing from the sign up page

2.
Reduce the friction in the flow of creating a new survey for newly signed up customers

3.
Help customers understand that they successfully paid for a survey

Design Approach

As a team we were monitoring our funnels and flows to see the overall conversion, activation and retention metrics. By observing our analytics MoM we saw that we had a broken funnel with a drop-off at key points in the user journey:

What we observed was that for our Researcher persona - one of the 2 core verticals of the platform - the drop off rate was massive even at their very beginning of their journey in using Pollfish. What was also alarming was the revenue generated by first time users.

Understanding the Researcher Persona  

Insights from customer support

I partnered with the Customer Support Manager to get insights from support tickets and find opportunities to invest in on-boarding based on current pain points.

In addition, I partnered with the Product Manager to craft a survey and get direct feedback from bounced customers. We focused both on the sign-up page and on the rest of the journey.

Launching the survey, 60% of bounced customers responded and of those, 10% agreed for a phone interview.

Some of the most significant insights were:

  1. “The sign up page doesn’t look trustworthy”
  2. “I am a Researcher and I couldn’t find how to sign up”
  3. “After sign up, I was left wondering in the dashboard”
  4. “After I paid I was directed to a blank page and didn’t know what to do!”

Understanding the Researcher Persona  

Insights from the sales team

I partnered with the Sales Manager to get a better understanding of how they approach potential customers.

I participated in 3 personalized demos in order to pick up details on the type of language and keywords the customers use in order to explain the product and also get an understanding on what customers are looking for when searching for platforms like Pollfish.

What I discovered was:

Crafting the new user journey and formulating hypothesis

I partnered with the Product Manager and the Customer Support Manager to formulate hypotheses, based on our findings, on how might we optimize the journey with small progressive quick wins so that we:

Hypothesis 1

We believe that

By redesigning the sign up page and communicating our value proposition better, then we will reduce the number of customers bouncing from that page and create a sense of trust.

Hypothesis 2

We believe that

By directing newly signed up customers to a welcome page where they can create a new survey, then we will reduce the friction and increase the number of new customers buying a survey.

Hypothesis 3

We believe that

By showing a success page after a customer buys a survey, then we will reassure them that their action has been processed and we will see an increase in people coming back for more surveys.

Quick win #1 - Redesigning the sign up page

As this was our first hypothesis, that customers are bouncing from that page and don't feel that they can trust the platform, we wanted to come with an idea of communicating our value proposition better and at the same time make the page feel trustworthy and fresh.

Utilizing the split screen UI pattern, I was able to enhance the value proposition through a gallery of images combined with copy and keywords that resonate with customers and inspire trust by showcasing high profile clients.  

Also, using tabs I was able to expose the other persona of Pollfish, the Publisher.

Quick visual iterations to get to the final result

We had just finished building our style guide, figuring out patterns, our typography, colors and tone of voice and designing the sign-up page was our crash-test whether or not our style guide would be helpful and worth the ROI or a disaster.

Thankfully, it turned out to be  extremely useful and jotting a new design was a quick and easy task.

Quick win #2 - Guide users when creating a survey

As this was our second hypothesis, that by directing newly signed up customers to a welcome page where they can create a new survey,  we will reduce friction of customers getting lost to the dashboard and increase the number of new customers buying a survey

Displaying a welcoming message and exposing the primary job to be done, which is to create a survey, instead of directing newly signups to the dashboard where it was easy to get lost and added extra steps to the flow.

Quick win #3 - Redesigning the sign up page

As this was our third an final hypothesis, that by showing a success page after a customer buys a survey, we will reassure them that their action has been processed and thus  see an increase in people coming back for more surveys.

By celebrating the moment when a customer has completed the most important task, to create a survey, and then buy it, we will be able to forge a positive emotional connection.

Takeaways

Ship and monitor the changes

Before progressing further in our on-boarding project we had to first evaluate our designs based on our hypotheses. We shipped our ideas and monitored the changes.

The biggest challenge through the whole project was to get the buy in for the concept of quick progressive wins rather than a big bang solution from key stakeholders such as the Product Manager and the CEO. I had to articulate very clearly and present a “road map” of milestones in order to make them feel comfortable with incremental solutions towards the end goal

Measuring the impact

After launching the new designs in February we monitored the changes for a month and saw an increase in most of our KPI’s. Since the launch ( February 2017), we saw a 3.8% increase in revenue MoM for the next 2 months which translates to ~18.000£ 🤑

Next Steps

Successful on-boarding takes constant iteration. For our first step, we focused on quick wins and on evaluating their impact. Since our experiment was successful our next steps will be focused on the rest of user journey: